Cancer Wellness Course

For someone who is undergoing cancer treatment or whom has just completed it, the idea of exercising could be quite daunting. However,research shows that exercise is increasingly recognized as a benefit during recovery and rehabilitation in cancer survivors. In fact, common findings include but are not limited to reduction in fatigue, improved immune function, physical fitness, body composition and improved quality of life and activities of daily living (Hacker,2009).

Where does one start? Well, consider Urban Poling (UP) in which there are over 240+ research articles on the benefits of walking poles for a variety of conditions and health parameters. Urban Poling is fun, easy and low impact. Not to be confused with low intensity…..you can make this exercise as intense as you’d like it to be!

Research supports the engagement of 90% of the body’s muscles with specialized walking poles which facilitates a great caloric expenditure- 20-46% more than regular walking (Tschentscher, et al. 2013) and greater adherence compared to walking and other exercise programs.

The following course designed with therapists who have an extensive and research backed knowledge in Cancer Exercise Rehabilitation will take you through the benefits of Urban Poling for Cancer Wellness as well as address Exercise Safety Guidelines, Benefits for Lymphedema and Cancer-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy. Furthermore, a demonstration of an effective Warm Up, Cool Down and Resistance Training Exercises with Urban Poles will be provided that will Power UP your exercise regimen.

Cost:  $299.99

Includes:

  • Online Cancer Wellness with Urban Poles Module
  • Online Urban Poling Instructor Certification Course or ACTIVATOR Course for Health Care Professionals
  • Urban Poles of your choice
Register Now
Going downhill

For moderately steep slopes, simply decrease the pressure on the base of the handles or drag your poles behind you. For steep slopes, keep your poles upright and in front and out to the side slightly, so if you do fall you won’t land on your poles. Bend your knees and elbows, and slow down any momentum. For long descents, it may be helpful to lengthen the poles.
Barb Gormley, Director of Education

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