ACTIVATOR Fall Prevention Webinar

We launched this presentation as a webinar in response to the warm reception it received at the National and Alberta Fall Prevention Conferences.

There are over 180 independent studies listed on PubMed demonstrating the benefits of walking poles, which include key factors relating to fall prevention. These factors include improved balance, core strength, posture and walking tolerance; reduced impact on painful joints; and increased confidence for walking.

The ACTIVATOR poles and technique were co-designed by an occupational therapist specifically to improve the safety and stability of walking poles. They are used extensively in rehab settings instead of canes, crutches & walkers (when appropriate), and in group exercise programs.

The 45 minute webinar covers a research review, features of ACTIVATOR poles, techniques and exercises in sitting and standing. Includes a brief summary of a pilot investigation by Kathryn Gywnn-Brett, PT & John Hudec, PhD focused on a fall prevention pole walking and exercise group with the Nova Scotia Health Authority & Cape Breton University.

Designed for: PT, OT, PTA, OTA and kinesiologists

Presenter: Mandy Shintani, BSc (OT), MA (Gero)

Click Here to view a previously recorded webinar

Mandy Shintani has been an occupational therapist for 25+ years and has her Master’s Degree in Gerontology. Her specialty area has been in community-based therapy for older adults.  Twelve years ago she co-developed the ACTIVATOR poles and technique specifically for older adults as well as for those with chronic conditions who may be at increased risk of falls due to poor balance. ACTIVATOR poles are now being used extensively in hospitals, clinics and retirement homes across Canada. ACTIVATOR poles were recently featured in the Canadian Physiotherapy Association Practice magazine and BC Physiotherapy Association magazine.

Note: This webinar is not intended to replace the 3.5 hour ACTIVATOR Course

 

 

 

Going uphill

Keep your poles more upright and in front of you. Lean forward slightly, and use the poles to help push you up the hill. If necessary, bend your elbows, but remember to transition back to the straight arm technique at the top of the hill
Barb Gormley, Director of Education

Tips from the Best