Active Living for Cardiac Health

Summarized by Dr. Agnes Coutinho PhD

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death among Canadians, despite an estimate by the World Health Organization that “80% of cases of coronary heart disease… could be avoided, or postponed” with lifestyle changes.

Currently, Cardiologists and cardiac rehabilitation professionals are prescribing walking to prevent, manage and treat CVD. Walking with Urban poles, compared to walking activates up to 90% of muscles providing both aerobic and resistance training with the potential to burn up to 46% more calories. This activity provides an excellent tool for healthy weight loss.

For these reasons, many hospitals are choosing to incorporate urban poling into their discharge information for cardiac rehabilitation patients to increase the benefits of cardiac rehab and serve as an excellent tool that can be used in the clinic to transitioning to the community.

After I suffered from 3 heart attacks and a long hospitalization, my muscles had atrophied so that I had lost most of my upper body muscle mass. After my cardiac rehab program, I started to use Urban Pole and the impact was remarkable. Strength once again returned to my upper body and my endurance increased. I do believe that urban poling will eventually bring me back to excellent health.
-Michael Whorms

Research Benefits

Evidence based studies on cardiovascular disease patients clearly identify poling as a healthy mode of physical activity suited for primary and secondary intervention, as well as rehabilitation. Urban Poling offers proven beneficial effects on key health parameters, including:

  • Lower resting heart rate
  • Higher VO2 max
  • Improved blood lipid profile
  • Lower total fat mass/decreased waist circumference
  • Higher exercise tolerance
  • Walking further, more frequently & faster
  • Improved mood


A study published by the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, concluded that walking with poles is superior to standard cardiac rehab, even for those following mild to moderate heart failure (Keast et al 2013).

Walking with poles has also been shown to lower resting heart rate (Chomiuk et al 2013) and blood pressure (Collins et al 2005; Chomiuk et al 2013), improve blood cholesterol and lipid levels (Hagner et al 2009) and exercise capacity (Kocur et al 2009)

“My doctor alerted me to my high blood pressure due to my weight. One day, I realized that I could hardly mow the lawn because my knees were killing me, and I had difficulty even doing everyday chores. My friend introduced me to urban poling. I love my poles which took weight off my knees so I could exercise and I have lost 100 pounds!
-Dolly from CBC Live Right Now Article

 

Why Health Professionals recommend Urban Poles

Urban Poles are built for fitness with these unique features:

  • Ergonomic handles developed for core strengthening
  • Strapless for injury prevention
  • Boot shape tips propel you forward to increase your workout
  • 3 Anti-vibration features minimizing stress on joints
  • ACTIVATOR poles are being prescribed for clients who also have balance issues

Consult your physician or therapist before using poles if you currently use a cane or walker, have any medical condition which affects your balance, stability, grip strength, vision, depth perception, judgement or co-ordination or you are currently recovering from injury or surgery.

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“Walking & exercise-based cardiac-rehabilitation programs are widely recommended as part of the continuum of cardiovascular care. Urban Poling, engages 90% of your muscles and helps you to burn up to 46% more calories versus walking alone. For this reason, the Cardiac Health Foundation of Canada and Urban Poling are working together to improve the cardiovascular health of Canadians across the country with Urban Poling a proud supporter of the Cardiac Health National WALK OF LIFE campaign.”
-Barbara Kennedy, Executive Director, Cardiac Health Foundation of Canada.

From our hearts to yours – Urban Poling wants to help Canadians achieve better heart health!

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Keep your poles more upright and in front of you. Lean forward slightly, and use the poles to help push you up the hill. If necessary, bend your elbows, but remember to transition back to the straight arm technique at the top of the hill
Barb Gormley, Director of Education

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